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Media lab program expanding to 27 more schools

By Brianna Spause on Oct 26, 2015 01:18 PM

With more than 1,000 middle and high school students completing WHYY’s Youth Documentary Workshops each year, the program has outgrown its home at WHYY headquarters.

To help increase student access to media arts production, the School District has teamed up with WHYY to bring Media Labs to 27 schools over the next three years. This expansion will provide video storytelling workshops and professional training to more than 700 students throughout the District.

'Glen's Village' screening at Franklin Institute this weekend

By Wendy Harris on Oct 23, 2015 03:16 PM

Have you seen Glen’s Village yet? If not, you’ve certainly heard the buzz about the 30-minute documentary that focuses on Glen Casey, a 20-year-old West Philadelphia native who found the supports he needed both in and out of school to rise from a life surrounded by drugs and violence, graduate from high school, and become a University of Pennsylvania student.

The film, which has received a series of awards since its release in May, will be screened in Philadelphia at noon on Sunday, Oct. 25, as part of the 18th annual FirstGlance Festival Philadelphia at the Franklin Institute.

The festival, which is held in Philadelphia and Los Angeles, brings independent filmmakers and audiences together to view a variety of feature films, documentaries, and short films. This screening of Glen’s Village will mark its first showing to a public audience in Philadelphia since its release in May and the 11th film festival into which it has been accepted.   

Notes from the news, Sept. 14

By Wendy Harris on Sep 14, 2015 08:38 AM

Caucus of Working Educators plans to challenge PFT leadership. Notebook

District's bid to outsource substitute teachers falters. NewsWorks

Sub troubles stress out many Philly schools. Inquirer

Outsourcing substitute teachers in Philadelphia gets off to a bad start. The American Prospect

Editorial: Wrong lesson plan. Inquirer 

Charter schools: Prefer building booms to classrooms? Philly.com

The get-rich business of charter consulting. Philly.com

At colleges, graduation initiatives save time and money. Inquirer

A broader picture of progress at Community College of Phila. Inquirer

Activists urge Comcast to contribute toward tech education. Inquirer

Protesters: Comcast chooses greed over schoolchildren. Daily News

Protestors demand Comcast expand affordable Internet access, fund schools. Voice

Does Bill Hite Have More Time? Philadelphia Citizen

What We Lose When A Neighborhood School Goes Away. NPR

Schools are starving for arts education. Notebook

Vote for 'Glen's Village' in The Online Film Festival. Notebook

88 keys to bringing music back to Philly schools. Notebook

Philly tech apprenticeship program lands major federal grant. Technically Philly

'Fin' a bad beginning for Bok building's rebirth. NewsWorks

Time for fond remembrances of teachers. Tribune

Your child goes off to college; where did 18 years go? Chestnut Hill Local

News summary from Keystone State Education Coalition


Application cycle for new charter schools now open, District says

By Wendy Harris on Sep 3, 2015 04:23 PM

The School District of Philadelphia announced today that the 2015-16 application cycle for new charter schools is now open.

The application cycle applies to new, "non-Renaissance" charters. Those interested in launching a charter school can fill out an application online through the District’s Charter Schools Office. Deadline to submit an application is at 5 p.m. on Nov. 15.   

Making career and technical education into a first-class option

By Bill Hangley Jr. on Aug 28, 2015 11:35 AM

 

David Kipphut has a mission: to transform what used to be called vocational education from a second-class backwater to a first-class pathway to prosperity in Philadelphia.

It’s an uphill climb in a cash-strapped district that prioritizes college attainment. Even so, Kipphut has seen significant progress since taking over the Office of Career and Technical Education (CTE) three years ago. Among his favorite examples: the welding program at Randolph High, which just graduated its first cohort.

CTE success stories: Bernard Buie, Applied Visual and Interactive Design graduate

By Michaela Ward on Aug 14, 2015 03:01 PM

The Philadelphia School District’s career and technical education (CTE) programs give students an opportunity to choose a career path that best matches their interests and talents, while gaining hands-on training in high school. Many students who have participated in one of the District’s 41 CTE programs have transitioned to post-secondary institutions – college, university, or technical school -- and some have also gotten jobs in their chosen fields right out of high school.

Central High RoboLancers compete in robotics championships

By Wendy Harris on May 12, 2015 10:59 AM

Central High School’s robotics team, the RoboLancers, competed at the FIRST World Championship in St. Louis in April. Thirty-nine students from the school’s robotics team traveled to the competition, where they showcased their robot that can collect and stack six large plastic storage bins using a chain. The robot was also able to complete other tasks.

Highlights from last night's SRC meeting

By Wendy Harris on Apr 17, 2015 03:22 PM

Tensions ran high at last night’s School Reform Commission meeting, where members of the student group Youth United for Change were escorted out of the auditorium by school police. Many had come to the meeting to protest the District's plan to close Kensington Urban Education Academy and merge it with Kensington International Business. Ultimately, the five-member panel voted unanimously to suspend part of the public school code in order to accelerate the school's closing process.

But that wasn't the only thing that happened at yesterday's meeting. In case you missed it, here are some other important highlights we are featuring that were tweeted by others at the meeting.

Lindback Foundation honors 7 Philadelphia principals

By Wendy Harris on Apr 14, 2015 02:15 PM

Seven principals will be honored this afternoon with the Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Foundation’s Distinguished Principal Award.

The annual award honors outstanding principals who have made great leadership and humanitarian contributions to their schools and communities. Each recipient will receive a $20,000 stipend to use in improving their school communities.

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