Menu
Please Join Today!
view counter

Things educators know about schooling that the public needs to know

By Julio C. Nuñez on Oct 28, 2015 01:49 PM

It has been 32 years since "A Nation at Risk" was published. The report, issued in 1983 by President Ronald Reagan's National Commission on Excellence in Education, established the beliefs that schools across the nation were failing and that we needed to demand more of our teachers and our students.

"A Nation at Risk" was the blueprint for our country's hyperfocus on "measurable growth" that education stakeholders experience today. It catalyzed a shift in the U.S. concept of education. Outcomes, not input, would determine the quality of instruction. Standards, not knowledge, would dictate what gets taught, how, and for how long. Students’ “seat time” would be favored over other activities that required physical engagement.

Many of the report's tenets were institutionalized in 2001 through the No Child Left Behind Act and further validated by the Race to the Top initiative in 2009, under the premise that these policies were necessary for the United States to maintain its competitive nature. The results have been mixed.

The idea that U.S. schools would have to overhaul curricula and expectations based on ideas plucked primarily from the business world did not resonate well with educators. To this day, teachers who leave the profession cite the emphasis on accountability as the reason: Why make students demonstrate growth from one lesson to the next, when all available research shows that cognitive development is far more complex, different for each child, and in many cases, difficult to measure?  

The effects of such policies are far more prevalent in urban public schools, where poverty is clustered. Here are some truths that are self-evident to educators, but might not be as clear to the public at large.


1. Predictability is a luxury seldom experienced in urban districts. From year to year, districts in major cities have to contend with whether they will have adequate funds to maintain buildings, academic programs, staffing levels, roll out new initiatives, or planning that goes beyond 180 days. This has been the norm for my district, where the conversations in spring and summer turn to how much money is left to begin the following year, how big the hole in the budget is, and who will be laid off or what will be cut.

2. Class size matters. Educators know that if there is one proven strategy that helps students gain skills and knowledge, it is small class sizes. Contrary to popular belief, maintaining small class sizes pays for itself. This is well-documented in the National Education Association’s 2008 policy brief "Class Size Matters: A Proven Reform Strategy." The NEA’s report showed that a cost-benefit analysis of the famous STAR project estimates that reducing class sizes from 22 to 15 in grades K-3 results in a $2 return on every $1 spent. Currently, the three kindergarten classrooms in my school average 25 students, and the two 1st grades stand at over 30.

3. Standardized assessments are a poor predictor of success or ability. Daily, students experience ups and downs that affect their participation in the classroom. It is no different on testing days. The added stress that some children feel to perform during assessment periods paradoxically leads them in the opposite direction. Further complicating the accuracy of results is the disconnect between what is taught in a given year and the single way in which accrued knowledge is assessed – predominantly through questions with only one right answer or open-ended responses that leave little or no room for creativity. This method of assessment does not cater to English language learners, special education students, or any child who is not a linear thinker.

4. Poverty is a factor. Among educators, the study about the 30 million word gap by age 3 that underprivileged children face, by University of Kansas researchers Betty Hart and Todd R. Risley, is widely known. The researchers’ findings shed light on the acute disparities between the number of words spoken and the types of messages heard by children of families from different socio-economic backgrounds. Children from low-income households would have heard 30 million fewer words than children from "professional" or wealthier families. Additionally, the messages children in low-income households heard were negative directives or discouragements. This disparity alone is evident once children enter the classroom, while undertaking academic tasks, or in simple interaction with peers. Moreover, the difficulties in gaining access to quality health care and proper nutrition further exacerbate their academic challenges.

5. Building teacher capacity is key. Each given year, a teacher might see administrators visit their classrooms twice or three times. If they’re lucky, they may receive some timely feedback. Rarely are they told how to improve. Building their capacity could be done not only through meaningful administrative feedback, but also through self-reflection protocols, student feedback, peer coaching, and teacher-led professional development. Colleges of education could also revamp their teacher preparation programs to include one-year internships in partnership with local school districts. This would result in a strong teacher candidate pool aware of the challenges they are likely to face in the classroom and some tools for mitigating them.

6. Diversity enriches the educational experience, but it is dwindling. UCLA’s Civil Rights Project’s report "Brown at 60: Great Progress, a Long Retreat and an Uncertain Future" found that “Black and Latino students tend to be in schools with a substantial majority of poor children, while white and Asian students typically attend middle class schools.” It also found that “Segregation is by far the most serious in the central cities of the largest metropolitan areas; the states of New York, Illinois and California are the top three worst for isolating black students.”

7. Unmeasured growth happens. Soft skills and character development run parallel to a child’s academic development. However, these skills do not register anywhere except with the teacher, and sometimes with the parents. This past year, one of my school’s kindergarten teachers invested extra time and care for one of her most challenging students. This child lacked the most basic skills to communicate thoughts and ideas, and did not understand the need for norms. At the end of the year, the progress that the student had made was monumental. He went from running in the hallway whenever he felt frustrated in communicating his needs to engaging in thoughtful conversation with peers. If we were to judge this child’s progress only by his report card, it would be concerning to any parent. However, just because the progress is not reflected on paper does not mean it does not happen.

8. Teaching is an act of selflessness. That’s it.

 

Our society has evolved to make children think their self-worth is attached to how many As they receive, how many Advanced Placement and honors courses they complete, or how many extracurricular activities they accumulate on their résumé.

Every day, the United States loses teachers who get frustrated with a narrow view of their profession. Students drop out because what they are being taught does not bear any resemblance to their present or future challenges, and the dwindling resources committed to public education send mixed signals to Americans and the rest of the world about our priorities.

The perspectives of educators and students are missing from educational policies. If policymakers continue to discourage or ignore the valuable feedback that educators are desperately trying to give them, we will surely move from "a nation at risk" to a nation in peril.

 

Julio C. Nuñez is vice principal of Julia de Burgos Elementary in North Philadelphia and is a doctoral student in educational leadership at Temple University.
 

Click Here
view counter

Comments (24)

Submitted by 2008 Crash 2.0 (not verified) on October 28, 2015 6:40 pm

Mr. Nunez, you didn't have to publish this piece, because we taxpayers have already heard this over and over again--teachers need more money, smaller classes, and less accountability.   Teachers  never stop reminding us that their students are often poor and at risk for issues like lack of food and medical care.   So I guess you guys have to keep hearing the same response from taxpayers:

1. The state of Pa. is broke with $100 billion in unfunded pension liabilities.  That alone is why school budgets fluctuate every year, from years with small budget cuts to years with big budget cuts.   PSERS exposes school budgets to the stock market because that's were it's invested, and the stock market is just about ready for another crash.  In addition to that, the stock market is unpredictable.

2.  The budget situation is going to get worse because of dismal investment returns reported by numerous pension funds like CalPERS and NYPERS.  No doubt PSERS is on track to report terrible returns on its portfolio of stocks, bonds, and derivatives.  School budgets are liable for investment losses of the teachers' pension fund.  

3.  Your suggestions for improving education are welcome but none of them can involve more taxpayer money because there isn't any more--not now and not ever.  What happened to the cigarette tax money?

4.  There's a great article "NY Times, At Success Academy Charter Schools, High Scores and Polarizing Tactics".   At Success Academy, teachers get 401K plans but the supply cabinet is always full of pencils, paper, and even iPads.   Another worthwhile article is "Wall Street Journal, the Myth of Charter School Cherry Picking".

5.  Yes, young people are not entering the education profession.  That's because some of them don't want to get into massive student loan debt, and then find out that no district is hiring because of budget cuts.  Or they can't be sure if they will be getting a pension from a pension fund that's bankrupt.   But the costs of college is another issue.  

6.  Why not ask the business professors at your college about the pension crisis in Pa. and Illinois?  They could explain it to you if you don't understand it.  Unfunded teachers' pensions are the number one issue facing schools--not common core, not ipads, and not testing.  

 

 

 

Submitted by trumpet (not verified) on October 28, 2015 10:57 pm

Only a person who has a personal interest in NOT paying taxes would write such an assault on tax paying teachers who invested in pensions and are now being blamed for market-based declines faciliated by right-wing ___ holes like your self. You are no taxpayer.

Submitted by Rich Migliore (not verified) on October 28, 2015 9:31 pm

Julio this is an excellent commentary. I enjoyed reading it and you are right. 

Submitted by Gloria Endres (not verified) on October 29, 2015 4:25 am

Ditto, Rich.

Submitted by James Lytle (not verified) on October 29, 2015 3:43 pm

Well said!

Submitted by Maura Bernt (not verified) on October 29, 2015 8:49 pm

Mr. Nunez is a fantastic educator at a school where the staff is doing so much with very little. Kuddos to them.

Submitted by Daun Kauffman (not verified) on October 29, 2015 10:41 pm

.

Allow me to add one more thing educators see? Something which most media and politicians ignore.  The "elephant in the room."

 

"Peek Inside a Classroom"

When you look inside a classroom, there are some things you will just never see.

Click here for "Jasmine",  click here for "Jose"

Submitted by micheal le (not verified) on April 17, 2017 10:28 am

tọng mặc thật đẹp xuống hay gặp Hoàng trong khoảng không lớn đến hiện nay tôi vẫn sống Trong tình yêu thương bọc gói của nhà và nhất là thân quan hệ tình dục

Submitted by jessia (not verified) on May 11, 2017 10:38 am
discover alternatives

with alternativeso in just one click

Submitted by George Y (not verified) on May 21, 2017 6:12 pm

Yes in our society there are still so many people for them education is the mean of earning money and through their private schools and colleges. They are earning a lot of money without paying superior papers customer reviews attention that how much is difficult for the normal person to bear the expense of education.

Submitted by shipkoren (not verified) on June 7, 2017 4:52 am

kha nang co duoc cau nho co kich thuoc lon hon voi san pham gel titan la rat tuyet voi ma cac chang nen tim hieu de su dung ngay hom nay. Do la mot dieu mà cac chang can tim hieu ngay de su dung ngay hom nay.

Submitted by lamdephoanmy (not verified) on June 7, 2017 4:41 am

Nhung van de ve viec chich xa giao gai xinh la dieu ma cac chang luon mo uoc thuc hien. De lam duoc dieu nay thi can co nhung dieu gì? Kham pha ngay bi quyet chich xa giao gai xinh moi nhat.

Submitted by mnih (not verified) on June 7, 2017 5:52 am

Only a person who has a personal interest in NOT paying taxes would write such an assault on tax paying teachers who invested in pensions and are now being blamed for market-based declines faciliated by right-wing ___ holes like your self. You are no taxpayer

Sent from YourProfitStore Review

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on June 30, 2017 7:48 am

It is the public who needs to know about the latest technologies and the changes in the field of education. There is lot of planning going on for the development of the sector and the people needs to be made aware of them. tablet pc wholesale

Submitted by ngoinhahanhphuc (not verified) on July 27, 2017 4:49 am

chuyen quan he tinh dục ma cac ban tre hien nay thuc hien kha nhieu anh huong xau den tuong lai cua ho. quan he khi con tren anh huong xau kha nhieu cho suc khoe.

Submitted by titan gel (not verified) on July 27, 2017 4:19 am

kem upsize ma nhieu chi em dang tim kiem de cai thien lai kich thuoc vong 1 cua minh ma chung toi cung cap do co nguon goc tu nga va hoa ky. no khong nhung lam to vong 1 mà con lam cho vong 1 dep hon.

Submitted by debramoragandeb (not verified) on August 3, 2017 5:20 am

Thank you so much for sharing this. The public needs to know this. attestation dubai

Submitted by nga (not verified) on August 3, 2017 12:20 pm
View more upsize of russia for women : https://goo.gl/gAMCSz
Big penis for TITAN GEL of russia for men view : https://goo.gl/PgWrdm
My web upsize in VN:  http://kemupsizenga.net/
Titan gel forr VN: http://titangel.org/
hotline: 0868.900.269
Thanks.
 
Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on September 5, 2017 2:30 am

xuất tinh sớm ở nam giới, nguyên nhân, dấu hiệu nhận biết và biện pháp khắc phục
 

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on September 9, 2017 12:05 am

xuất tinh sớm ở nam giới luôn là vấn đề gây rất nhiều khó khăn cho các quý ông. Đâu là nguyên nhân gây xuất tinh sớm ở nam giới, các cách chữa bệnh xuất tinh sớm. Tìm hiểu thêm về biện pháp phòng tránh và khắc phục xuất tinh sớm

Ngoài ra một vấn đề các quý ông cũng cần phải quan tâm đó chính là những tác hại của xuất tinh sớm

Submitted by peter (not verified) on December 8, 2017 6:23 am

good post

Submitted by peter (not verified) on December 8, 2017 6:25 am

good post

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.

By using this service you agree not to post material that is obscene, harassing, defamatory, or otherwise objectionable. We reserve the right to delete or remove any material deemed to be in violation of this rule, and to ban anyone who violates this rule. Please see our "Terms of Usage" for more detail concerning your obligations as a user of this service. Reader comments are limited to 500 words. You are fully responsible for the content that you post.

Follow Us On

Read the latest print issue

Philly Ed Feed

Recent Comments

Top

Public School Notebook

699 Ranstead St.
Third Floor
Philadelphia, PA 19106
Phone: (215) 839-0082
Fax: (215) 238-2300
notebook@thenotebook.org

© Copyright 2013 The Philadelphia Public School Notebook. All Rights Reserved.
Terms of Usage and Privacy Policy